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Make Your Food Look Super Pretty With This Edible Flower Guide
23/08/2017

These days, everyone can be a food photographer thanks to Instagram. In this social media-crazed era, it may seem like arranging everything you eat into aesthetically pleasing meals might be a lot of work for nothing. Or, maybe you are one of them in, which case we don’t judge you at all (seriously, all we have for you is admiration!).

If you have a busy life and making your salad pretty isn’t a top priority, then don’t worry! It’s totally possible to have the best of both worlds. You can have a salad that’s pretty on the eyes and the time to actually eat it. The key is edible flowers.

Not only are edible flowers a quick fix to making ordinary salads turn into appetizing culinary masterpieces that will impress guests and Instagram followers alike, they are also a nutrition powerhouse. Studies show that edible flowers contain a wide variety of vitamins and minerals such as calcium, iron, and zinc, as well as antioxidants like flavonoids, anthocyanins, and phenolic acids. All of which may contribute to preventing cancer and providing our bodies with inflammation-fighting fuel.

If you’re not convinced yet that adding edible flowers to your salads is worth the time and effort, know this: eating pretty food may actually make it taste better. Studies show that the way we perceive flavors is influenced by all five of our senses, including sight. This means that if you’ve been struggling with healthy eating, making your next salad look more appetizing might actually make it easier for you!
http://www.flowerexperts.com/13050170823


Antarctic flowers could hold the key to the perfect sunscreen
23/08/2017

Scientists in Chile have discovered molecules in two species of Antarctic flowers that protect the plants from solar radiation and could potentially be used in products such as sunscreen for humans and protection for vulnerable crops.

Researchers at the University of Santiago investigating the properties of Antarctic plants grown under controlled conditions found that Colobanthus quitensis (pearlwort) and Deschampsia antarctica (hair grass) could tolerate high levels of ultraviolet radiation.

According to the British Antarctic Survey, these are the only two flowering plants found in the icy polar region, growing around its more temperate edges.
http://www.flowerexperts.com/13049170823


Flowers, coffee and vinyl: Barworks to create hipster central in London Fields in Hackney
23/08/2017
Hipsters, brace yourselves. The company who run Shoreditch favourites The Diner and Electricity Showrooms is creating an "all-day neighbourhood bar restaurant and café concept". Barworks has secured a converted warehouse (of course) in Hackney's trendy London Fields for the project, which will feature a bar, restaurant and deli alongside local business concessions. The 25-year lease on Keltan House puts 8,800 sq ft at the company's disposal. Every hallmark of hipster London will be there, from artisan coffee to vinyl shopping.
http://www.flowerexperts.com/13051170823

The joy of scented-leaved pelargoniums
23/08/2017
Coton Manor in Northamptonshire has many delights on offer: gentle brooks and dappled pools surrounded by beautiful ferns, sweeping borders, wildflower meadows and lovely courtyards, not to mention the four bright-pink flamingos, standing one-legged, with one eye nonchalantly taking in passersby. They are definitely a step up from the peacock-on-the-lawn trick. There is a fine tea to be had at the end, too. I would have liked to run off with the flamingos, the vistas and half the ferns, but being train-bound I went home with four scented-leaved pelargoniums instead. I have placed them in pretty terracotta pots by the french doors, so I can sit in the afternoon sun and take in their perfume. Scented-leaved pelargoniums are just that: pelargoniums grown not for their flowers but for their highly fragranced leaves. In the wild – they come mainly from South Africa – they grow as shrubby, evergreen perennials and are very drought- and heat-tolerant. The fragrance runs from spicy to sweet: rose, lemon, apple, peppermint, nutmeg, cinnamon, almond, eucalyptus, grapefruit, celery, camphor and even eau de cologne. The rose- and lemon-scented versions can be used in cooking, to add an extra something to jams, compotes and cakes. Every now and then, I like the odd leaf in a gin and tonic.
http://www.flowerexperts.com/13052170823

Genetic engineering creates an unnaturally blue flower
23/08/2017
Blue flowers are rare in nature, and for good reason: the color is usually the result of mutations and quirks of acidity levels rather than an actual blue pigment. That makes genetically engineering a blue flower tricky, since you can't just make a straightforward tweak and expect a garden full of unnatural hues. Scientists have just managed a breakthrough, though. They've produced the first truly blue chrysanthemum (above) by splicing in genes from two naturally blue flowers, the butterfly pea and Canterbury bell. The modifications shifted the plant's acidity level, turning normally reddish pigments to the blue you see above.
The approach is generic enough that you could theoretically apply it to other flowering plants. Blue roses, anyone? There are broader possibilities, too. While the exact techniques clearly won't translate to other lifeforms, this might hint at what's required to produce blue eyes or feathers. And these color changes would be useful for more than just cosmetics. Pollinating insects tend to prefer blue, so this could help spread plant life that has trouble competing in a given habitat. Just don't count on picking up a blue bouquet. You need a permit to sell any genetically modified organism in the US, and there's a real concern that these gene-modified flowers might spread and create havoc in local ecosystems. The research team hopes to make tweaked chrysanthemums that don't breed, but that also means you're unlikely to see them widely distributed even if they do move beyond the lab. Any public availability would likely hinge on a careful understanding of the flowers' long-term impact.

http://www.flowerexperts.com/13053170823

Picking edible flowers? Make sure you choose carefully
31/07/2017

Picking edible flowers? Make sure you choose carefully


http://www.flowerexperts.com/13047170731

Genetic engineering creates an unnaturally blue flower
31/07/2017

Genetic engineering creates an unnaturally blue flower


http://www.flowerexperts.com/13044170731

Children at Nether Stowey Primary enjoy planting flowers
31/07/2017

Children at Nether Stowey Primary enjoy planting flowers


http://www.flowerexperts.com/13045170731

Spiders lure bees for dinner by making flowers look flashier
31/07/2017

Spiders lure bees for dinner by making flowers look flashier


http://www.flowerexperts.com/13048170731

What is floriography? Everything you need to know about the secret language of flowers
31/07/2017

What is floriography? Everything you need to know about the secret language of flowers


http://www.flowerexperts.com/13046170731

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